WORKOUT

Losing weight in 4 weeks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C8LxBcVjJK

Aerobic Dance Workout

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tj9d6aBOzDo

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The Benefits of Physical Activity.

Staying Active: Introduction

Although there are no sure-fire recipes for good health, the mixture of healthy eating and regular exercise comes awfully close. Most of The Nutrition Source is dedicated to singing the praises of a good diet. This is where physical activity gets its due.

Regular exercise or physical activity helps many of the body’s systems function better, keeps heart disease, diabetes, and a host of other diseases at bay, and is a key ingredient for losing weight. According to the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, (1) being physically active on a regular basis

  • Improves your chances of living longer and living healthier
  • Helps protect you from developing heart disease and stroke or its precursors, high blood pressure and undesirable blood lipid patterns
  • Helps protect you from developing certain cancers, including colon and breast cancer, and possibly lung and endometrial (uterine lining) cancer
  • Helps prevent type 2 diabetes (what was once called adult-onset diabetes) and metabolic syndrome (a constellation of risk factors that increases the chances of developing heart disease and diabetes; read more about simple steps to prevent diabetes)
  • Helps prevent the insidious loss of bone known as osteoporosis
  • Reduces the risk of falling and improves cognitive function among older adults
  • Relieves symptoms of depression and anxiety and improves mood
  • Prevents weight gain, promotes weight loss (when combined with a lower-calorie diet), and helps keep weight off after weight loss
  • Improves heart-lung and muscle fitness
  • Improves sleep

The Cost of Inactivity

If exercise and regular physical activity benefit the body, a sedentary lifestyle does the opposite, increasing the chances of becoming overweight and developing a number of chronic diseases. Despite all the good things going for it, only about 30 percent of adult Americans report they get regular physical activity during their leisure time—and about 40 percent of Americans say they get no leisure-time physical activity at all.  Studies  that measure people’s physical activity using special motion sensors (called accelerometers) suggest that self-reports of physical activity probably are over-estimated. . According to analyses by a team from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention, inactivity was associated with more than 9 million cases of cardiovascular disease in 2001, at an estimated direct medical cost of nearly $24 billion.Another CDC analysis suggests that because individuals who are physically active have significantly lower annual direct medical costs than those who are inactive, getting people to become more active could cut yearly medical costs in the U.S. by more than $70 billion.

Being a “couch potato” may be harmful even for people who get regular exercise.  The Nurses’ Health Study, for example, is one of many, many studies to find a strong link between television watching and obesity. Researchers followed more than 50,000 middle-aged women for six years, surveying their diet and activity habits. They found that for every two hours the women spent watching television each day, they had a 23 percent higher risk of becoming obese and 14 percent higher risk of developing diabetes. Interestingly, it didn’t matter if the women were avid exercisers: The more television they watched, the more likely they were to gain weight or develop diabetes, regardless of how much leisure-time activity and walking they did. Long hours of sitting at work also increased the risk of obesity and diabetes.

More recently, studies have found that people who spend more time each day watching television, sitting, or riding in cars  have a greater chance of dying early than people who spend less time on their duffs. Researchers speculate that sitting for hours on end may change peoples’ metabolism in ways that promote obesity, heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions.  It is also possible that sitting is a marker for a broader sedentary lifestyle.

In sum, a morning jog or brisk lunchtime walk brings many health benefits—but these may not entirely make up for a day spent in front of the computer or an evening in front of the television set. So as you plan your daily activity routine, remember that cutting down on “sit time” may be just as important as increasing “fit time.”

Physical Activity Guidelines: How Much Exercise Do You Need?

Jump Rope (jump-rope.jpg)If you don’t currently exercise and aren’t very active during the day, any increase in exercise or physical activity is good for you. Aerobic physical activity—any activity that causes a noticeable increase in your heart rate—is especially beneficial for disease prevention. Some studies show that walking briskly for even one to two hours a week (15 to 20 minutes a day) starts to decrease the chances of having a heart attack or stroke, developing diabetes, or dying prematurely. (Brisk is a relative term; read more about exercise intensity.)

The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommends that healthy adults get a minimum of 2-1/2 hours per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, or get a minimum of 1-1/4 hours per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity, or a combination of the two. To lower your risk of injury, it’s best to spread out your activity over a few days in of the week. (Read more about how to exercise safely.)

You can combine moderate and vigorous exercise over the course of the week—say, by doing 20 to 25 minutes of more vigorous intensity activity on two days, and then doing 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity on two days. It’s fine to break up your activity into smaller bursts, as long as you sustain the activity for at least 10 minutes. Adults should also do muscle-strengthening activities on at least two days for the week. Children should get at least 1 hour or more a day of physical activity in age-appropriate activities. Healthy older adults should follow the guidelines for adults.  

Exercise Intensity: What’s Moderate, What’s Vigorous?

Soccer Ball (soccer-ball.jpg)Moderate-intensity aerobic activity is any activity that causes a slight but noticeable increase in breathing and heart rate. One way to gauge moderate activity is with the “talk test”—exercising hard enough to break a sweat but not so hard you can’t comfortably carry on a conversation. Vigorous-intensity aerobic activity causes more rapid breathing and a greater increase in heart rate, but you should still be able to carry on a conversation—with shorter sentences. 

Keep in mind that what feels like moderate activity for one person may actually be very vigorous activity for another: A typical young marathon runner, for example, could walk at a 4-mile-per-hour pace without breaking a sweat. But this same pace would likely feel very vigorous for the typical 90-year-old person.

One way to gauge how hard you are exercising is to use the Borg Scale of Perceived Exertion. It’s a relative scale that matches how hard you feel you are working with numbers from 6 to 20. Exercise experts measure activity in a different way, using metabolic equivalents.

Walking—and Bicycling—Your Way to Health

Green Bicycle Traffic Light (bicycle-traffic-light.jpg)Walking is an ideal exercise for many people—it doesn’t require any special equipment, can be done any time, any place, and is generally very safe. What’s more, studies such as the Nurses’ Health Study. Health Professionals Follow-up Study,  Women’s Health Study,   Harvard Alumni Health Study, National Health Interview Survey, Women’s Health Initiative,  Honolulu Heart Program,Black Women’s Health Study,and others (18, 19) have demonstrated that this simple form of exercise substantially reduces the chances of developing heart disease, stroke, and diabetes in different populations.

Though walking has health benefits at any pace, brisk walking (at least 3 miles per hour) is more beneficial than slow walking for weight contro. lAnd a recent report from the Nurses’ Health Study II suggests that bicycling offers similar benefits to brisk walking: Researchers followed more than 18,000 women for 16 years to study the relationship between changes in physical activity and weight. On average, women gained about 20 pounds over the course of the study. Women who increased their physical activity by 30 minutes per day gained less weight than women whose activity levels stayed steady. But the type of activity made a difference: Women who added bicycling or brisk walking to their activity regimens were able to curb their weight gain, but women who added slow walking were not.

Brisk walking may be challenging for some people, and bicycling (even on an exercise bike) may be a more comfortable option.In the Nurses’ Health Study II, for example, overweight women spent far less time walking briskly than normal weight women, but they spent about the same amount of time cycling.  If you don’t like brisk walking or bicycling, any activity that makes your heart work harder will help you meet the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, as long as you do it long enough and often enough. Walking and biking are also green ways to commute to work—good for the environment, and good for you.

Watch a video discussion on the importance of bicycling and walking in preventing and alleviating hypertension.

More Activity Equals More Benefit

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Keep in mind that 2-1/2 hours of moderate-intensity aerobic activity a week is an excellent starting point, not an upper limit. Exercising longer, harder, or both can bring even greater health benefits.   Also bear in mind that your 2-1/2 hours of activity should be in addition to the light activity that is part of everyday living. But moderate and vigorous lifestyle activities—dancing, mowing the lawn with a push mower, chopping wood, and so on—can count toward your weekly total, if they are sustained for at least 10 minutes.

Exercise for Weight Loss and Maintenance

If you’re looking to avoid “middle-aged spread,” physical activity is important, as is watching what you eat. But there’s no hard and fast rule as to how much activity you will need to keep your weight steady. Many people may need more than 2-1/2 hours of moderate intensity activity a week to stay at a stable weight, as well as to lose weight or keep off weight they have lost.

Start Slow, Increase as Your Fitness Grows

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The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are general recommendations aimed at the general population. The problem with guidelines is that they try to cover as many people as possible. In other words, they aren’t right for everyone. How much exercise you need depends on your genes, your diet, how much muscle and fat you carry on your frame, how fit you are, and your capacity for exercise.

A study of more 7,000 men who graduated from Harvard before 1950 suggests that older people, those who are out of shape, or those with disabilities may get as much benefit from 30 minutes of slower walking or other exercise as younger, more fit people get from the same amount of more-intense activity.

In other words, if an exercise or physical activity feels hard, then it is probably doing your heart—and the rest of you—some good, even if it doesn’t fall into the “moderate” category. If you are currently not active at all, it may be daunting to start out with 30 minutes a day of activity, five days a week. So start with a shorter, less-intense bout of activity, and gradually increase over time until you can reach or exceed this goal.  This “start slow, build up over time” advice for physical activity applies to everyone, but it’s especially true for older adults, since starting slowly can help lower the risk of injury—and can make exercise more enjoyable.

Don’t get stuck in a rut, though. As your body adapts to exercise, you’ll need to push yourself more and more to get the same cardiovascular workout. Another way to know that it’s time to pick up the pace is if you see your weight or waist size start creeping up on you.

The Bottom Line: Move More, Sit Less

Exercise is one of those rare things where the hype actually meets reality. Next to not smoking, getting regular physical activity is arguably the best thing you can do for your health. Any amount of exercise is better than none. The more you get, though, the better. And remember: Cutting back on television-watching and other sedentary pastimes is just as important as becoming more active.

Source:http://www.hsph.harvard.edu

23 Healthy Foods Everyone Should Know How To Cook.

1. A CREAMY  AVOCADO TOAST

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Avocado toast is basically the easiest thing in the world to make, and good for you thanks to avocado’s plentiful Omega-3’s. But it tastes so luxurious, you’ll feel like you’re cheating at life when you eat one. It’s also, BTW, very chic.

A  simple avocadotoast is just toast (stick with whole grain for more fiber and nutrients) + avocado (sliced or mashed) + sea salt + red pepper. But that’s just the beginning; you can top it with an egg, a drizzle of nice olive oil, or try this avocado+feta +pomegranate toast for a sweet and savory mix. The options are endless. Go crazy. Run free.

2. NUTRITIUS OATMEAL

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Hot oatmeal on a cold morning is a winter survival necessity. It’s also a great way to stay full until lunch and an excellent source of soluble fiber, the kind that helps keep your cholesterol levels down. You can make it  on the stove  in the microwave or in a cooker In warm weather, you can make overnight oats in the fridge without lifting a finger. Get lots more smart oatmeal tips here.

3. A FILLING GREEN SALAD

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If you think salads are for rabbits, you haven’t met the right one yet. A few tips: Use fresh vegetables — anything canned should be an add-on, not the main event, or you’ll end up with a soggy, sad salad. Add a little bit of protein like meat, eggs, beans, nuts, if you want the salad to be a full meal. Make sure you give yourself a good mix of crunchy ingredients, like raw cabbage, cucumber or nuts, and soft ones, like tomatoes, cooked vegetables or beans.

The most important step is to make your own delicious (and healthier) homemade dressing. A simple Dijon vinaigrette always works, but feel free to try something more adventurous , too. If you’re looking for a full recipe to get inspired, try this kale and Brussels sprout salad or this Asian chicken salad.

4. Smooth HUMMUS

Smooth HUMMUS

Hummus, which happens to be full of protein and fiber, is basically the perfect food. You can dip carrots or celery in it when you’re looking for a healthy snack, or spread it on a sandwich instead of mayo. You can also just dip your finger in it and eat it plain.

To make it yourself, you just throw a few basic ingredients (chickpeas, tahini, garlic, lemon juice and salt) in the blender and process. Get the recipe for classic, extra-smooth hummus here a stepped-up roasted red pepper version here, or a powerhouse protein edamame hummus recipe here.

5. A Big Pot of VEGETABLE SOUP

A Big Pot of VEGETABLE SOUP

When it’s cold out, a big pot of hot soup is literally the most beautiful thing in the world. You can make it with just vegetables  or add in protein like  chichen or beans.This recipe is mostly vegetables but uses a little bit of pancetta and a parmesan rind for flavor.

But you don’t really need a recipe. You can just chop up whatever vegetables you have around and sauté them in some olive oil in a big pot with the seasoning of your choice. (If you’re using chicken, chop it up, and sauté that first.) Add a can of rinsed beans and sauté for another minute or two. Add stock, bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to simmer, cover, and allow to cook for about 20 minutes. If you want noodles, cook them separately and throw them in at the end. Ladle into (big) bowls and enjoy.

6. Crispy ROASTED VEGETABLES

Crispy ROASTED VEGETABLES

Roasting vegetables is one of the easiest, most reliable ways to cook them. Turn your oven up to 450°F. Chop your vegetables, with the harder ones, like carrots and potatoes, cut up into smaller pieces than soft vegetables like broccoli and squash. Toss them all with some olive oil and kosher salt. Spread on a baking sheet or two – don’t crowd! – and roast for about 30-40 minutes, or until they look and taste good.

Here’s a basic recipe to get you started. Once you’ve got roasted veggies, you can toss them in some pasta, a salad, put them on a sandwich, or obvs, eat them plain.

7. Basic QUINOA

Basic QUINOA

You don’t have to be a health nut to love quinoa. This little seed has tons of protein and the flavor is subtle enough that it can work in almost any dish. Make sure to rinse quinoa before you cook it to wash away any bitterness. After that, put it in a saucepan, add twice as much water or broth as you have quinoa, and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce the flame to medium-low, cover, and simmer for about 15-20 minutes, or until the water is absorbed. Remove from heat and give it 5 minutes to sit, covered, before you open it and give it a nice fluff. It’ll last about a week in the fridge and can be added to basically anything.

8. An Easy STIR-FRY

An Easy STIR-FRY

Stir-fry is what you make when you want something hot, healthy, and quick. It shouldn’t be complicated. Stir-fries are great with lean meats or tofu. (Tofu takes a little bit more time because you have to press out all the excess moisture, but it’s a healthy and inexpensive substitute for meat, and can be really delicious if you get it nice and crispy.) Whatever you decide to throw in, the basic idea is the same: Sear the protein, sauté the vegetables over high heat, and add sauce at the end. Serve over brown rice or by itself.

Check out these recipes for chiken, tofu and  lean beef stir-fries. You don’t need to follow them exactly, but the techniques will work with a variety of vegetables and add-ons.

9. A Spicy BEAN CHILI

A Spicy BEAN CHILI

Standard chili calls for ground beef, but the truth is, you don’t need it. Beans will do the protein job just fine without bringing any saturated fat to the party. If you do want to add meat, try a recipe that calls for chicken or turkey. And definitely make extra: Chili freezes really well. Vegan bean chili recipe available here  and white chicken chili recipe here.

10. A Veggie-Filled FRITTATA

A Veggie-Filled FRITTATA

Frittatas come in handy in many situations, including serving breakfast to large groups of people, using up leftover vegetables, and making a food you can eat for days. Frittatas can be made with any vegetables you have around, so use recipes for guidance more than specifics. You don’t have to use cheese (this   onion and potato frittata , but if you do, goat cheese is great because it’s much lower in calories and fat than other cheeses. Use it with mushrooms and herbs  or  artichokes and herbs.

11. A Healthful Bowl of PASTA

A Healthful Bowl of PASTA

Don’t believe anyone who tells you pasta can’t be healthy. It can. And those who deny themselves the joy of pasta do not live their greatest lives. First, use whole wheat pasta because like brown rice, it has more nutrients and fiber. Second, add PLENTY of vegetables and some healthy protein. Third, limit your sources of saturated fats like cream, butter, cheese, and fatty meat.

Try this Whole Wheat Rigatoni with Roasted Vegetables and Pine Nuts, or this Linguine with Shrimp, Olives, and Sun-Dried Tomatoes. You can also tweak your favorite recipes to be healthier: Try making this fusilli with roasted broccoli and cauliflower with whole wheat noodles, half the pasta and cheese, and twice the veggies.

12. Not Boring GRILLED CHICKEN

Not Boring GRILLED CHICKEN

Grilled chicken is easy to make and lean, healthy meat, but it gets a bad rap for being bland. The key is to pair the chicken with big, interesting flavors. If you have the time (and forethought), go with a marinade. You can freestyle with these handy tips or use a recipe like this Grilled Chicken in Caramelized Onion Sauce. But you can also throw together a delicious grilled chicken on the spot, like this Garlic-and-Rosemary Grilled Chicken with Scallions.

13. A Super SMOOTHIE

A Super SMOOTHIE

Smoothies are an easy and delicious way to pack in a lot of nutrition at once. Whether it’s a green detox smoothie, a seasonal fruit smoothie, or a very simple three-ingredient smoothie, the key is to make sure that you have a combination of fruits, vegetables, and protein so it’s well-balanced AND tasty.

Feel free to have fun with the liquid you add. Water is great, but so is regular milk or non-dairy milks. Just don’t bother with recipes that call for added sugar, and be wary of juices, which are often high in sugar, and protein powders, some of which have been found to have high levels of toxins like arsenic, cadmium, and lead.

14. Baked NON-POTATO CHIPS

Baked NON-POTATO CHIPS

Kale chips were all the rage for a while, but they’re hardly the only non-potato that can be baked into a delicious, crispy chip. You’re basically just putting some oil and salt on thin strips of vegetables and baking them. Not very hard, but very delicious! Get lots of veggie-heavy, less oily ways to satisfy your crunchy/salty craving here.

15. Simply Sautéed GREENS

Simply Sautéed GREENS

Keeping some greens in your fridge at all times is a fail-proof way to make sure you always have an easy vegetable side dish at dinner. Greens like spinach and kale are some of the healthiest vegetables out there, packed with protein, vitamins and fiber.

Sautéing greens is as simple as heating some vegetable oil in a pan, adding chopped greens, and salting to taste. If you want to get a little fancy, start with some garlic, shallot or onion before you add the greens. You can also add lemon juice, vinegar or red pepper. This will work for spinach, kale, chard, mustard greens, or pretty much anything else you come across. Recipe here.

16. Homemade POPCORN

Homemade POPCORN

When you’re craving a salty snack, homemade popcorn is the perfect solution. It’s super-easy to make, can be flavored according to your whim, and it’s healthier and cheaper than the movie-theater or microwaveable kinds. In this recipe for stovetop popcorn, spritz some water on the popcorn instead of pouring melted butter over it, and then sprinkle with salt. It will still be delicious with a lot less fat. (And btw, you can also just make it in a paper bag in the microwave.)

Once you’ve mastered the basics, feel free to spice things up with different flavors. And if you’re a big snacker, consider making space in your kitchen for an air popper.

17. An Easily Improvised GRAIN SALAD

An Easily Improvised GRAIN SALAD

Most of us hear “salad” and think “lettuce,” but using grains as a base can be healthy, filling, and a really good way to use up all the extra brown rice you accidentally made last night. Throw in whatever veggies, cheese, beans, or meat you have on hand and top with your favorite homemade dressing. This Curried Spelt Salad is delicious, as is this Quinoa, Lentil & Feta Summer Salad, but feel free to improvise with whatever you have in the fridge.

18. Tasty BAKED or BROILED FISH

Tasty BAKED or BROILED FISH

You’ve probably heard it a hundred times: Fish is really good for you. It’s high in protein but also low in fat, making it an excellent alternative to pork or red meat. White-fleshed fish like tilapia is especially low in fat, while oily fish like salmon is extra high in Omega-3’s. However, some fish are higher in mercury than others, and a lot of species are at risk due to overfishing. The National Resources Defense Council has information here to help you make the best choice when you’re buying.

Even when choosing fish isn’t easy, cooking it can always be super-simple. One of the easiest and healthiest ways is to bake it in parchment paper, but broiling is another easy option for when you want something quick and crispy. For a quick, easy marinade, try mixing oil, soy sauce, garlic, Dijon mustard and scallions, with proportions according to taste. (The more mustard, the spicier, the more soy saucer the saltier, etc.) It will work on basically everything. Get a recipe for broiled salmon here.

19. Crispy BAKED FRIES

Crispy BAKED FRIES

You can eat French fries without betraying your arteries; just bake them instead of frying. Also: Leave the skins on. There are a ton of nutrients in there. (Okay, yes, this is essentially roasted potatoes, but the skinny wedge shape really makes a difference!)

Get an easy recipe here, baked sweet potato fries here, and if you really want to go wild, try these baked parmesan zucchini fries.

20. An Easy SLOW-COOKER STEW

An Easy SLOW-COOKER STEW

One of the biggest hurdles to eating more healthy food is cooking more healthy food. Sometimes you just don’t have the time or energy, and that is why God created slow cookers. They cook things slowly, with plenty of liquid, which means you won’t need nearly as much fat to keep things delicious. You just throw all the ingredients in in the morning, press a button, and come home later to a hot, healthy meal. Try this chicken enchilada soup, a root vegetable stew, or chicken provençal.

Don’t like stew? Try this lazy quinoa lasagna, or, if you’re willing to spend a few extra minutes with a skillet, this mushroom barley risotto.

21. A Well-Balanced FRUIT SALAD

A Well-Balanced FRUIT SALAD

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There are tons of ways to make a great fruit salad, but it takes a little bit more thought than just throwing a bunch of fruit in a bowl and hoping for the best. First, you need good fruit. Choose what’s in season. Second, be mindful of the fruit combinations — more is not necessarily better. Third, add a simple but delicious dressing. A fail-safe dressing formula: citrus juice + fresh herb + honey or syrup. For more tips on making a perfect fruit salad, click here.

22. Low-Sugar CHOCOLATE PUDDING

Low-Sugar CHOCOLATE PUDDING

Chocolate. Is. Amazing. Don’t deprive yourself, just learn to enjoy in ways that are healthier than a Snickers bar. Chocolate pudding is the perfect solution, because there are so many ways to make it (secretly) good for you. Try this chocolate avocado pudding when you don’t have a lot of time, these chocolate mousse cups if you’re looking to trick someone (or yourself) into eating tofu, or a chia seed and date chocolate pudding if you’re looking for something a little funky.

23. A Refreshing FRUIT SORBET

A Refreshing FRUIT SORBET

When it’s hot out, dessert should be cold — but no one said it has to be ice cream. Making sorbet is a perfect way to use up fresh fruit that’s past its prime (or whatever happens to be in your freezer). Get a step-by-step guide here.

Source: http://www.buzzfeed.com

The 10 Healthiest Foods on the Planet

Healthy Food 1: Lemons

Why They’re Healthy:

— Just one lemon has more than 100 percent of your daily intake of vitamin C, which may help increase “good” HDL cholesterol levels and strengthen bones.

— Citrus flavonoids found in lemons may help inhibit the growth of cancer cells and act as an anti-inflammatory.

Quick Tip:

Add a slice of lemon to your green tea. One study found that citrus increases your body’s ability to absorb the antioxidants in the tea by about 80 percent.

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Healthy Food #2: Broccoli

Why It’s Healthy:

— One medium stalk of broccoli contains more than 100 percent of your daily vitamin K requirement and almost 200 percent of your recommended daily dose of vitamin C — two essential bone-building nutrients.

— The same serving also helps stave off numerous cancers.

Quick Tip:

Zap it! Preserve up to 90 percent of broccoli’s vitamin C by microwaving. (Steaming or boiling holds on to just 66 percent of the nutrient.)

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Healthy Food #3: Dark Chocolate

Why It’s Healthy:

— Just one-fourth of an ounce daily can reduce blood pressure in otherwise healthy individuals.

— Cocoa powder is rich in flavonoids, antioxidants shown to reduce “bad” LDL cholesterol and increase “good” HDL levels.

Quick Tip:

A dark chocolate bar contains about 53.5 milligrams of flavonoids; a milk chocolate bar has fewer than 14.

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Healthy Food #4: Potatoes

Why They’re Healthy:

— One red potato contains 66 micrograms of cell-building folate — about the same amount found in one cup of spinach or broccoli.

— One sweet potato has almost eight times the amount of cancer-fighting and immune-boosting vitamin A you need daily.

Quick Tip:

Let your potato cool before eating. Research shows that doing so can help you burn close to 25 percent more fat after a meal, thanks to a fat-resistant starch.

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Healthy Food #5: Salmon

Why It’s Healthy:

— A great source of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been linked to a reduced risk of depression, heart disease, and cancer.

— A 3-ounce serving contains almost 50 percent of your daily dose of niacin, which may protect against Alzheimer’s disease and memory loss.

Quick Tip:

Opt for wild over farm-raised, which contains 16 times as much toxic polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) as wild salmon.

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Healthy Food #6: Walnuts

Why They’re Healthy:

— Contain the most omega-3 fatty acids, which may help reduce cholesterol, of all nuts.

— Omega-3s have been shown to improve mood and fight cancer; they may protect against sun damage, too (but don’t skip the SPF!).

Quick Tip:

Eat a few for dessert: The antioxidant melatonin, found in walnuts, helps to regulate sleep.

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Healthy Food #7: Avocados

Why They’re Healthy:

— Rich in healthy, satisfying fats proven in one study to lower cholesterol by about 22 percent.

— One has more than half the fiber and 40 percent of the folate you need daily, which may reduce your risk of heart disease.

Quick Tip:

Adding it to your salad can increase the absorption of key nutrients like beta-carotene by three to five times compared with salads without this superfood.

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Healthy Food #8: Garlic

Why It’s Healthy:

— Garlic is a powerful disease fighter that can inhibit the growth of bacteria, including E. coli.

— Allicin, a compound found in garlic, works as a potent anti-inflammatory and has been shown to help lower cholesterol and blood-pressure levels.

Quick Tip:

Crushed fresh garlic releases the most allicin. Just don’t overcook; garlic exposed to high heat for more than 10 minutes loses important nutrients.

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Healthy Food #9: Spinach

Why It’s Healthy:

— Spinach contains lutein and zeaxanthin, two immune-boosting antioxidants important for eye health.

— Recent research found that among cancer-fighting fruits and veggies, spinach is one of the most effective.

Quick Tip:

Spinach is a healthy — and flavorless — addition to any smoothie. You won’t taste it, we promise! Try blending 1 cup spinach, 1 cup grated carrots, 1 banana, 1 cup apple juice, and ice.

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Healthy Food #10: Beans

Why They’re Healthy:

— Eating a serving of legumes (beans, peas, and lentils) four times a week can lower your risk of heart disease by 22 percent.

— That same habit may also reduce your risk of breast cancer.

Quick Tip:

The darker the bean, the more antioxidants it contains. One study found that black bean hulls contain 40 times the amount of antioxidants found in white bean hulls.

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Weight Loss Tips

1.Drink plenty of water.

First how to lose weight fast tip is tht our body needs a lot of water so give in to water.Water is not just way to flush out toxin but if you have more water in your body you will generally feel healthier and fitter.This itself will discourage anyy tendency too gorge.The best thing about water is that it has no calories at all.unnamed

2.Start your day with a glass of water.

As soon as you wake up,gulp down a glass of cool water.It is a wonderful way to start your day you only need a lesser quantity of your breakfast drink after that.A glass of water lets out all your digestive juices and sort of lubricates the insides of your body.You may have your morning cup of tea but have it after a glass of water.

3.Drink a glass of water before you start the meal.

Water naturally needs some space so that you feel fuller without actually having to stuff yourself.index

4.Have another glass of water while you are having the meal.

Again this is another great how to lose weight fast super tip and a way of making yourself full,another great weight loss tips,so that you can actually rise from the table eating less but feel full just the same time.Instead of drinking it  one gulp,take sips after each morsel.It will help the food to settle faster so that you can get the feeling that you are never hungry.Water is such a remarkable thing,but seldom do we give it the credit  that it deserves.Did  you know that over 66% of your  body weight is nothing else but water.Its amazing.Water also plays a vital role in weight control,which is why I donated so much space to it above.

5.Stay away from sweetened bottle drinks, especiaslly sodas.

All those colas and fizzy drinks are sweetened with sugar and sugar which means calories.the more you can cut out on these sweetened bottle drinks.the better for you.So if you must drink sodas, then sticj to diet sodas.soda-drinks

6.Include in your diet things that contain more water like tomatoes and watermelons.

These things contain 90% to 95%  water so that there is nothing that you have to lose by feasting on them.They fill you up without adding to the pounds.food

7.Eat fresh fruits instead of drinking fruit juice

Juice is often sweetened but fresh fruits have natural sugars.When you eat fruit, you are taking  in a lot of fiber,which is needed by th ebody, and fruits of course are an ezcellent source of vitamins.Juicng-of-Fruits

8.If you have a craving for fruit juice then go for fresh fruit juice.

Instead of these that contain artificial flavors and colors or even better try making your own fruit juice taking care not to sweeten it with too many calories.Fresh vegetable juices on wooden table, on green background