The Workout for Every Guy – The Beginners Workout.

Start Slow

“The body and mind are terribly homeostatic machines,” Grasso says. “They constantly search for comfort and consistency,” so deciding to make a slew of changes at once often leads to failure.

“Making minor amendments to your daily routine will fl y under the radar of your conscious thought and become positive habits.” In other words, if you start so gradually that you barely notice the change, you’ll be more apt to continue it and make more changes without them ever seeming daunting.

Train two days per week.

This isn’t asking a lot, so try to go at the same times every week. Get used to making appointments with yourself and keeping them. But if you don’t feel like working out, don’t. Just go to the gym, walk in, and leave if you want. The important thing is that you establish the habit of going. At the very least, change into your workout clothes when you get there—you can change back out of them and leave right away. In no time, you’ll be going to the gym and staying to train, and regular exercise will be a part of your life.

Stand up straight.

Want an easy way to tell if you’re performing your exercises correctly? Check your posture. The correct starting position for most exercises is shoulders back, chest out, standing (or sitting) tall, with your abs tight. Good posture, good form.

Directions:

Frequency:

Perform the two workouts (Day 1 and 2) once per week, resting at least a day between each.

Time Needed: 35 min

How to Do It:

Perform the exercises marked with letters as a group. Do one set of A, rest, then one set of B, rest (note that some groups have an exercise “C”), and repeat until all sets are complete. Then go on to the next group. Perform three sets of 8–10 reps for each exercise.

After 1 Month:

By this point, working out has become part of your routine, and you look forward to it. If not, continue to at least show up at the gym (even if you don’t have the desire to go through with the workouts) until the habit sticks. Remember to continue adding healthy meals to your diet—you should be at two per day by now.

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Source:http://www.mensfitness.com

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50 Fitness Truths That Will Make You Rethink Your Lifestyle.

Fitness Truths

50-Fitness-Facts-You-Need-to-Know

  1. Carbohydrates, protein, fat, and alcohol have 4, 4, 9, and 7 calories per gram respectively.
  2. It takes about a 3500 calorie deficit to lose 1 pound.
  3. Insulin and growth hormone have an inverse relationship. You must keep insulin under control if you want growth hormone to do its job of mobilizing fat.
  4. The average person can store 500 grams of glycogen.
  5. Only fat and protein are essential macronutrients – carbohydrates aren’t (but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t eat them).
  6. Muscle glycogen is about 3 parts water to 1 part glucose. This can add water weight at the beginning of a strength training program.
  7. You burn more calories during the 23 hours you don’t exercise than the 1 hour you do.
  8. You don’t need to do cardio to lose weight. You only need a calorie deficit. But that doesn’t mean isn’t a useful tool.
  9. The fat burning zone does not burn more total fat calories – only a higher percentage of calories from fat. Total calories burned is what matters.
  10. You’re never too old to do squats.
  11. Weight loss is not a physical challenge – it’s a mental one.
  12. The scale cannot measure your body fat. However, this body fat caliper can. Use it.
  13. You can eat anything you want and still lose weight – but weight doesn’t always equal fat.
  14. You can’t target fat loss – fat loss is systemic.
  15. Muscle does not weigh more than fat – it’s just denser than it.
  16. Zero grams of fat on a label doesn’t always mean there’s no fat in the food product. Always check the ingredients.
  17. Whole grain bread can be highly processed – pick one that uses only whole food ingredients.
  18. Eating healthy is not more expensive than a junk food diet, especially once you consider health care costs down the road.
  19. You can’t calculate body fat percentage from height and weight alone – you need to physically measure it.
  20. You can get glucose from both protein and glycerol – not just carbohydrates.
  21. Just because a box says “whole grain” on it, it doesn’t make it healthy.
  22. You should never attempt weight loss at the expense of your health.
  23. Trying to be perfect with your diet sets you up for failure. Strive to make progress by continually creating healthy eating habits.
  24. Workout times and negative side effects are positively correlated. The quality of your workouts is more important than the quantity.
  25. Gym membership prices are usually negotiable. Don’t be afraid to ask.
  26. Cooking your food can both lower some nutrient content, and make some more bio-available.
  27. There’s a high correlation between the fitness level of the people close to you, and your own physical fitness.
  28. It’s harder to put on 10 pounds of muscle than it is to lose 10 pounds of fat.
  29. Once an adult, fat cells can be created, but they cannot be lost – only shrunken. But that doesn’t mean they can’t shrink to close to nothing.
  30. Eating at night does not make you fat – overeating does.
  31. You don’t need to do curls to get good biceps. Heavy rowing movements are excellent arm builders.
  32. Being skinny does not automatically mean you have a low body fat. Body composition is what matters most.
  33. The perimeter of the grocery store is where 90% of the healthy food is.
  34. If bad food is in the house, you’ll be more likely to eat it.
  35. Thyroid hormone output and exercise intensity are positively correlated.
  36. Healthy levels of testosterone are good for both men and women.
  37. You don’t need a gym membership to strength train. Your body weight is all the resistance you need.
  38. Unless you weigh less than 120 pounds, it’s unlikely you need less than 1200 calories to lose weight.
  39. Workout intensity is positively correlated with the degree of EPOC – the afterburn effect. Boost your intensity if you want to burn more fat.
  40. There are 3 types of skeletal muscle fibers – type I, type II-A, and type II-B.
  41. 80% of people who begin an exercise program will quit. About the same goes for people starting a diet.
  42. The body has 3 energy systems – ATP-PC, anaerobic glycolysis, and aerobic.
  43. Strength gains come from muscle hypertrophy and improved muscle fiber recruitment. Include a variety of rep ranges in your workouts.
  44. Dehydrating a muscle by 3% can cause a 10% loss of strength. Drink plenty of water throughout the day.
  45. The thermic effect of food (TEF) is highest for protein. Up to 30% of its calories are used for digestion and assimilation.
  46. Lactic acid is not the cause of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Lactic acid returns to normal levels within 60 minutes of finishing exercise.
  47. The more muscle mass you have, the more calories you burn at rest. Muscle tissue eats fat at all hours of the day.
  48. Direct abdominal exercises are not necessary to get good abs. Abs are used as stabilizers when you do squats, deadlifts, and many other exercises. Only a good diet will make them visible.
  49. You can lose weight and still gain muscle; likewise, you can also gain weight while still losing fat.
  50. Consistency and patience are key to long term successful weight loss.Running Girl

Source:http://www.coachcalorie.com

The Perfect Workout

Upper and Lower Body Workouts Using Super-Set / Pyramid Methods

Many people like to do calisthenics based workouts using pyramids and super set routines. In fact, with the right mix of exercises you can create a perfect workout that balances the entire body. Here is a question that prompted the following article:

“Stew, do you have any lower body workouts in the pyramid form? I would like to put together a program using your ‘The Best Twenty-Minute Workout’ and the pyramid program from the ‘USMC – Basic School Six Week OCS/TBS Program.’ Four days a week, 20 min workout on odd days and the USMC workout on even days.”

I love to do pyramids and super set workouts. In fact they are a great foundation builder as well as a proven maintenance method for calisthenics based programs. As you know, my workouts are primarily calisthenics based and supplemented by weights, stretching, running, swimming and biking for distance and speed. With the wide range of movements and exercises, you can work the entire body inside and out and create programs to improve fitness performance, athleticism, and overall health.

Some workouts, I recommend focusing only on the calisthenics or weights and do a cardio option later in the workout. For instance:

A Sample Upper Body and Lower Body Workout:

The Upper Body

Pick exercises that work well together like push-ups or dips, abdominal exercises, and pull-ups. Arrange them in a way that you can perform an “active rest” by doing another exercise to “rest” the previous worked muscles from the exercise before.  For instance:

Set #1 Set #2 Set #3 Set #4 Set #5
2 Pull-ups 4 Pull-ups 6 Pull-ups 8 Pull-ups 10 Pull-ups
5 Push-ups 10 Push-ups 15 Push-ups 20 Push-ups 25 Push-ups
10 Abs of Choice 20 Abs of Choice 30 Abs of Choice 40 Abs of Choice 50 Abs of Choice

…continue on until failure or just before and repeat in reverse order

Some days I recommend mixing in some sprinting exercises into your workouts. This helps with training for the PFT transitions that must occur when doing upper body PFT and then running afterwards.

You can also mix in the same exercises in one of my favorite workouts that will help you reach max repetition in these exercises during fitness tests:

Repeat until you reach these numbers using max repetition effort each set:

Pullups – In as few sets as possible get 50-100 pullups by resting with:

– Pushups (max reps in one minute)
– Situps (max reps in one minute)

And

– Running 1/4 mile in goal PFT running pace (ie 9:00 1.5 mile goal = 90 seconds 1/4 mile)

Repeat this cycle until you reach your goal in pull-ups in the 50 -100 range.

For Lower Body Workouts using a Pyramid and Super Set:

Here is how I recommend creating a pyramid mixed with fast paced cardio:

Run / Leg PT

Repeat 5-6 times

– Run 1/4 mile at goal PFT pace
– Squats – 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 , 20…(increase reps each cycle for 5-6 cycles)
– Lunges 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20

You could make each set harder if you like the pyramid version or keep each set the same and basically make it a Super Set.

Two more leg workouts I recommend that are non-impact aerobics:

Life Cycle Pyramid Workout

Get on a Life Cycle stationary bike. Perform a bike / leg pyramid by going on manual mode and start off at level 1 for 1 minute. Each minute add a level of resistance until you cannot peddle anymore. Then repeat in reverse order. This usually takes 20-30 minutes depending on your fitness level and creates the perfect workout: a warm-up, max out, and cool down. That is one advantage to the pyramid: its simplicity and completeness.

Swim Workout with Fins

Another involves swimming with fins. Using any stroke, though the side stroke or combat swimmer stroke works best, swim across the pool until your feet / ankles start to feel the cramping sensation of first wearing fins. You may need to take some time to build up to 500-1500m of swimming with fins as it is stressful on the ankles and feet for the first few weeks.

But, if you want to really pump up your swimming workouts, try adding in a mix of leg PT / weights and pull-ups, dips, pushups, and abs in between 200-300m of swimming with fins. Of course this requires having a pullup / dip bar on the pool deck but our PT group donated this one to the pool we frequent and it packs a punch to a regular swimming workout.

Usually, we spend about 45 seconds rotating from exercise to exercise: Wood chopper squats, pull-ups, dips, abs of choice, and pushups – then swim for 4-5 minutes and repeat several times.

Source:http: //www.military.com/military-fitness/workouts/perfect-workout